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March 2024

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You've seen our article about the thousands of daffodils on and around the property at Ironstone Vineyards -- if you haven't, here's a great guide to all of the different species we have on the property: https://www.ironstonevineyards.com/daffodils/ -- now it's time to take a look at all of the tulips! In this article we'll dive into all of the different types of tulips that exist on the property and what to look for when trying to identify them. Come by Thursday through Sunday and see how many you can spot for yourself! Tulip Triumph Largest group of Tulips, sturdy stems that withstand April showers. Most are 10-16” tall, single cup

Those who have been to Ironstone Vineyards in the Spring, know how remarkable seeing the thousands of daffodils can be. In the last 27 years, the grounds keepers have planted over 75 tons of daffodils - (that's nearly 1.25 million bulbs!) While, for most, simply marveling at the array of colors and shapes these beautiful spring flowers take shape in is enough, here is a guide for all of you who want to take your daffodil knowledge a step further. This article will examine the different types of daffodils that exist on the property and what to look for when trying to identify them. Daffodil Double Showy with multiple layers

  From the ancient Egyptians crushing grapes in stone vats to the modern marvels of temperature-controlled fermentation tanks, technology has always played a crucial role in shaping the art of winemaking. Let's raise a glass to some of the key innovations that have transformed this age-old practice!   Ancient Foundations Fermentation Vessels - Early winemakers relied on amphorae, clay jars, and even animal skins for fermentation. These vessels, though simple, laid the groundwork for later advancements. Some examples of different ancient fermentation vessels: [caption id="attachment_18292" align="aligncenter" width="823"] Ancient Qvevri used for making wine[/caption] Qvevri: These large, egg-shaped clay vessels are some of the oldest vessels that are still being used today for fermenting and aging wine.

If you’ve been to the Sierra Foothills, you’ve likely noticed some recurring themes: Charming main streets with quaint downtowns boasting beautifully preserved 19th-century architecture, antique shops, and art galleries like those in Murphys and Sutter Creek Stunning landscapes with rolling hills, towering pines, and hidden waterfalls in places like Calaveras Big Trees State Park and the Mokelumne River Unique geological wonders to explore like Moaning Caverns, Mercer Caverns, or Natural Bridges And, of course, the undeniable allure of their renowned wineries. If you know, you know that these aren't your average bottles. Each sip whispers tales of a land imbued with distinctive soul. From the sun-drenched slopes to the rugged volcanic soils,

The release of the 2016 film, “Sour Grapes”, had so many of us both intrigued and terrified at the idea of investing in wine. While we know that certain iterations of history’s favorite bottled bliss hold the potential for an incredibly rewarding investment, it’s taking that first step and actually putting down some cash -- on a bottle that’s not just strictly for our own taste buds’ enjoyment -- that can be daunting, even for seasoned enthusiasts. This guide will serve as your first sip from the goblet, providing key insights to help you embark on your journey of collecting and investing in wine. Understanding the Vintage: Just like people